Sunday, January 31, 2016

Tech Talk Monday Night

Are you a digital immigrant?  Do you find online technology challenging, confusing or just too complicated? If so, you many be a perfect candidate for Tech Talk, a program offered by the Glenview Public Library to explore, learn and talk about the Internet, smart phones and online devices.

The first Monday evening of each month at 7 PM in the Technology Lab, the Glenview Public Library hosts an Internet discussion group for exploring websites, electronic publications, social media, online searching and electronic devices including computers, laptops, smart phones, iPads and tablets.  Past topics: downloadable eBooks from MyMediaMall, downloadable eJournals from Zinio and PressReader, free online learning courses for ESL, foreign languages or Lynda.com, Pinterest, Facebook, managing your email, and using Google for more than just searching.

Discussion originates from comments and questions from attendees so bring your topic with you. No registration required, just drop-in, bring your device with you, use a library PC, or just watch the overhead projector as we click our way through multiple online resources and learn as we go. New members welcome.

Thursday, January 28, 2016

Nonfiction Book Review

Navel Gazing: True Tales of Bodies, Mostly Mine (But Also My Mom's,Which I Know Sounds Weird) 

Cover image for Navel gazing : true tales of bodies, mostly mine (but also my mom's, which I know sounds weird)Known for his cerebral, sardonic, and dry-as-a-bone comic persona, Michael Ian Black – star of beloved cult classics like The State and Wet Hot American Summer – seems like the celebrity least likely to write a touching memoir about cancer and middle-aged malaise. But Navel Gazing is just that – an unexpectedly moving and insightful portrait of a son coming to terms with his mother’s terminal illness and his own fears about aging. Alternately hilarious and heartbreaking, the book explores Black’s bodily imperfections, his misadventures in diet and exercise, and his futile attempts to beat back his own mortality. Black is a deceptively good storyteller, finding warmth and humor in the bleakest of subject matter. The book strikes just the right tonal notes; it’s sweet but not maudlin, funny but never crass. Navel Gazing belongs in the top echelon of celebrity memoirs. It’s also the funniest book about cancer that you’ll read this year. –Romi Pekarek Smith


Library Program--The Other Side of the Will

The Other Side of the Will--A Primer for Estate Executors
Wednesday, February 17, 2016
7-8 PM
Community Room



You have been chosen as the executor of a loved one's estate. Now what happens? CPA Jay Greenstein of Weiss & Company, and attorney Karen O'Grady of O'Grady Law Group will explain the financial, tax, and practical responsibilities of the executor's role.  Please register here.



Nonfiction Book Review

This is a collection of some of the best of Lillian Ross' essays in The New Yorker, where she has been a writer since 1945. Some are very long pieces, others just a few pages. She follows Hemingway around New York late in his writing career, spends some time with Judi Dench and Maggie Smith and shows their friendship and bond. One particularly strong essay is a visit with Robin Williams and his wife in their home, revealing how his film projects evolved. The contents are not in chronological order, but that doesn't detract from clear writing about interesting and memorable people. --Iva Freeman

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Senior Housing Assistance Program--Application Deadline is February 5, 2016

The Village's Senior Housing Assistance Program is designed to assist Glenview residents with their property taxes or rent. Applications for the 2016 program are now available. The Village has approved up to $1,922 per year toward rent or property taxes for qualifying Glenview senior citizens.  The deadline to apply is February 5, 2016.

To qualify for the Village's Senior Housing Assistance Program, you must have lived in Glenview for at least two years and you must be at least 62. Qualifying annual income for a single person must be below $17,655, and for a two-person household it must be below $23,895.  Medical expenses, such as insurance premiums and medications, are deducted from the income with verification of the payment.​​

Click here to access the application and instructions.

Completed applications and documentation will be accepted at Glenview Village Hall Senior Services, 2500 East Lake Avenue, from February 1 through 5 -- one week only -- after which home visits will be scheduled. Call (847) 904-4366 with questions.

Friday, January 15, 2016

Glenview Ranked Among the Best Cities in Illinois for Families

When it comes to choosing where to live, several towns throughout the Chicago suburbs get high ranks for being among the best places to raise a family in Illinois, as stated in recently released rankings by WalletHub. Seven of the top ten best towns in Illinois are located in the Chicago suburbs, according to WalletHub’s 2016 Best and Worst Cities for Families list.  Among the best suburbs are Deerfield (#2), Libertyville (#4), Hinsdale (#6), Cary (#7), Lake in the Hills (#8), Frankfort (#9) and Naperville (#10). Glenview came in at #36 on the list.  Find WalletHub’s research methodology here.  
Reported by Glenview Patch.

Join us for a discussion of Spare Parts

Cover image for Spare parts : four undocumented teenagers, one ugly robot, and the battle for the American dreamBookit! Nonfiction Book Discussion Group

Wednesday, January 27
7 PM, Multipurpose Room
No registration necessary -- Just drop in!

Spare Parts: Four Undocumented Teenagers, One Ugly Robot, and the Battle for the American Dream by Joshua Davis

This book tells the inspirational story of four undocumented Mexican American teenagers who entered a prestigious robot-building contest at the University of California -- and won. After the contest, the boys' resolve was tested further when anti-immigrant backlash and maddening bureaucracy presented even greater challenges in their lives.

Copies of Spare Parts are available now at the Readers Services desk.

Friday, January 8, 2016

License Plates Renewal Information

The Illinois Secretary of State's office has suspended the mailing of vehicle registration renewal reminder notices. Vehicle owners are encouraged to be mindful of their vehicle registration status. Register to receive your license plates renewal notice by e-mail here. You will need the Registration ID and PIN located on your current registration card. If you do not have a current registration card, please call the Public Inquiry Division at 800-252-8980 to obtain your Registration ID and PIN number.

Wednesday, January 6, 2016

Nonfiction Book Review

Cover image for Hunger makes me a modern girl : a memoir 
Hunger Makes Me a Modern Girl by Carrie Brownstein

Long before she captivated audiences with her exuberant onstage antics, frenetic guitar stylings, and outspoken feminist politics, Carrie Brownstein was just a lonely, anxiety-ridden kid looking for connection in the suburbs of the Pacific Northwest. In her new memoir Hunger Makes Me a Modern Girl, Brownstein traces her evolution from shy record-store dweller to bona fide indie-rock star in the acclaimed band Sleater-Kinney. She also candidly explores how family secrets from her childhood -- including her mother’s anorexia and her dad’s closeted homosexuality -- intensified her life-long search for identity and a sense of community. Fans of Portlandia, Brownstein’s quirky satirist television show, might be disappointed that the book ignores that chapter in the author’s life. However, music fans will appreciate that Brownstein provides an engrossing history of Sleater-Kinney’s rise to fame, painting fond but human portraits of her famous friends and bandmates along the way. Meanwhile, feminist readers will appreciate how Brownstein thoughtfully critiques the subtle sexism inherent in rock journalism. (Despite raves, critics often slapped Sleater-Kinney with the reductive “girl band” label.) Others may be surprised to find that the book is just plain good; it’s that rare musical memoir that transcends the standard “life on the road” narrative, evoking something more lyrical and intimate in the process. -- Romi Pekarek Smith

Thursday, December 31, 2015

Senior Housing Assistance Program

The Village's Senior Housing Assistance Program is designed to assist Glenview residents with their property taxes or rent. Applications for the 2016 program are now available. The Village has approved up to $1,922 per year toward rent or property taxes for qualifying Glenview senior citizens.

To qualify for the Village's Senior Housing Assistance Program, you must have lived in Glenview for at least two years and you must be at least 62. Qualifying annual income for a single person must be below $17,655, and for a two-person household it must be below $23,895.  Medical expenses, such as insurance premiums and medications, are deducted from the income with verification of the payment.​​

Click here to access the application and instructions.

Completed applications and documentation will be accepted at Glenview Village Hall Senior Services, 2500 East Lake Avenue, from February 1 through 5 -- one week only -- after which home visits will be scheduled. Call (847) 904-4366 with questions.

Recycle Christmas Trees and Holiday Lights

Now that that the holidays are over, there is an environmentally responsible way to dispose of your Christmas tree. Trees can be dropped off until January 31 at these designated collection points:
  • Glenview Public Works, 2498 East Lake Avenue
  • Johns Park, 2101 Central Road
  • Flick Park, 3600 Glenview Road
  • Cunliff Park, 540 Echo Lane
  • Cole Park, 1031 Kenilworth Avenue
  • Willow Park, 2600 Greenwood Avenue
  • Gallery Park, 2500 West Lake Avenue (by the tennis courts)

Residents can drop off holiday lights for recycling at the Public Works Department, at the corner of East Lake Avenue and Shermer Road, through February 26, 2016. A receptacle is outside the center for collection marked with a sign.
Acceptable items for recycling include: mini-lights or Italian lights; C7 lights, C9 lights, rope lights, LED lights and extension cords. All colors and lengths of lights will be accepted.
Items that will not be acceptable for recycling include: garlands, live greens, wreaths or other non-recyclable materials.